Development of the steam-iron process for hydrogen production
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Development of the steam-iron process for hydrogen production

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Published by Dept. of Energy, for sale by the National Technical Information Service] in [Washington], [Springfield, Va .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Iron -- Hydrogen content.,
  • Hydrogen.,
  • Synthesis gas.

Book details:

Edition Notes

Statementprepared by Institute of Gas Technology ; prepared for the United States Department of Energy ....
ContributionsUnited States. Dept. of Energy., United States. Energy Research and Development Administration.
The Physical Object
Paginationv. :
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL18017484M

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A description of the Steam-Iron Process for hydrogen production and operating results from a large-scale pilot facility are presented. Significant achievements of the pilot plant program are discussed. Commercial applications and economic advantages of the process are by: 2. The Steam-Iron process is one of the oldest commercial methods for the production of hydrogen. The process was practised from the early s well into s for supplying small quantities of pure hydrogen to some industries (e.g., aerial navigation). Later, the technology was supplanted by the more efficient and economical natural gas reforming. 文章. IGT. Development of the Steam-Iron Process for Hydrogen Production[M]. Washington: Dept of Energy, 被如下文章引用: TITLE: 化学链重整直接制氢技术进展 AUTHORS: 曾亮,巩金龙 KEYWORDS: 制氢,合成气,二氧化碳捕集,化学链,重整 JOURNAL NAME: 化工学报 DOI: / The steam–iron process is one of the oldest methods of producing hydrogen. It is a cyclic process for water cleavage, whereby coal is consumed. Coal is gassified to a lean reducing gas, containing carbon monoxide and by:

Experimental results performed with a fluidized-bed reactor supported the feasibility of the three processes including direct reduction of iron oxide by char, H 2 production by the steam−iron process, and the oxidation of Fe 3O 4 resulting from the steam−iron process to Cited by: The steam–iron process is one of the oldest methods of producing hydrogen. It is a cyclic process for water cleavage, whereby coal is consumed. Coal is gassified to a lean reducing gas, containing carbon monoxide and hydrogen. This gas reacts with iron oxides (haematite Fe2O3, magnetite Fe3O4. Gasification of coal and biomass and pyrolysis of oil can be coupled with steam-iron process for the production of hydrogen. Iron oxide can be used in the process as it is a cheap and abundant material. A block diagram of this process is shown in Fig. by: Abstract. Commercially available hydrogen production methods such as steam reforming of natural gas, partial oxidation of heavy oil, coal gasification, coal carbonization, steam iron process that are based on fossil hydrocarbons and methods in the stage of development, like thermolysis, radiolysis and photolysis of water, thermochemical cycles, hydrogen from hydrogen Cited by:

However, this process is energy intensive and process economics are adversely affected as scale is decreased. There are many situations where a smaller supply of hydrogen, sometimes in remote locations, is required. To this end, the steam-iron process, an originally coal-based process, has been re-considered as an by: 4. Keywords: chemical looping, hydrogen production, biogas, steam iron process. The reformer steam iron process (RESC) is a technology for decentralized on-site hydrogen production to upgrade biomass into a superior energy carrier for mobility applications [1]. development of the reformer steam-iron process, which offers the perspective of a decentralised on-demand hydrogen production out of emission-free hydrocarbon feedstocks (e.g. biogas). This technology addresses both described issues by: The production of environment-friendly hydrogen utilising renewable hydrocarbons to reduce the global CO Cited by:   In the steam−iron process, relatively pure hydrogen can be produced from pyrolysis oil in a redox cycle with iron oxides. Experiments in a fluidized bed showed that the hydrogen production from pyrolysis oil increases with increasing temperature during reduction. The experimental hydrogen production at nearly °C with noncatalytic (blast furnace) Cited by: